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The Crickets' Dance - Movie Review

The Crickets' Dance

There is a slow-moving beauty embedded within each shot of The Crickets’ Dance.  It echoes resoundingly into the audience, too.  It bounces around within the landscape and it comes to a boil as a mystery is unearthed.  That beauty also stretches toward narrative itself as one attorney finds herself inheriting a stunning antebellum mansion which opens doors she never thought possible.  From the past to a glorious future, the story tucked within The Crickets' Dance is an endearing one as a future presents itself to her from the bloody pages of the past. 

"a female-led production that embraces and celebrates the qualities and the love shared between women as formative influencers"


Based on the novel by Deborah Robillard and directed by Veronica Robledo (who also adapted the screenplay), The Crickets’ Dance is a female-led production that embraces and celebrates the qualities and the love shared between women as formative influencers.  It is a movie that sets a high bar for itself in spite of its low budget and it works to create a reminder for us all.

Welcome to the southern and pastoral charm of The Crickets’ Dance, a movie which hinges upon the discovery of a diary which was tucked deep inside the attic of Miss Claudia’s mansion, which Angie Lawrence (Kristen Renton, Sons of Anarchy) inherits.  She might be a successful lawyer, but she’s so far unlucky in love and finds bliss when distracted by the diary, whose pages retell the brutal history of slavery in an unjust time.  

Entralled by a story of love overcoming those beasts of slavery, she finds herself reading and reading and reading, barely noticing the world outside her as Andrew McGrath (Maurice Johnson) is assigned an office to share with her at work.  None of it matters outside the story of Annabeth (Ashley Robillard) and her love for Isaiah (Marquies Wilson)!The Crickets' Dance

Even an unwarranted attack from an angry client doesn’t dampen her excitement over Annabeth’s diary.  Sure, Andrew saves her, but her mind is preoccupied with the drama of the past.  Forget about any concern for her, just who is Annabeth?  Her life might have been cut short, but surely there is a connection to be found between her young life, the love discovered, and the descendants of the mansion.

And it is right under both of Angie and Andrew’s noses.  One; however, needs to let go of the past and the other needs to accept it before the mystery of the mansion can be solved.  From romance to crime, The Crickets’ Dance is an eye-opening mystery which proves that only the passing of time can heal the wounds of the past as racial prejudices give way to the future.

Featuring superb performances from Bill Oberst Jr, Sandra Ellis Lafferty (The Hunger Games : Catching Fire), Bobbie Eakes (All My Children), William Mark McCullough (L.A’s Finest), KateLynn Newberry (Widow’s Point) and Kevin Mikal Curry (Samaritan), The Crickets’ Dance might be the mystery we all need to solve within our own hearts.

Director Veronica Robledo’s award-winning crime drama The Crickets' Dance comes to digital October 26 from Gravitas Ventures.

3/5 stars


Film Details

The Crickets' Dance

MPAA Rating: Unrated.
Runtime:

Director
: Veronica Robledo
Writer:
Veronica Robledo
Cast:
StarsKristen RentonSandra Ellis LaffertyBill Oberst Jr.
Genre
: Drama | Crime
Tagline:
Angie Lawrence finds the love she has longed for while giving Andrew McGrath the keys to a past he thought was gone forever.
Memorable Movie Quote:
Distributor:
Gravitas Ventures
Official Site: https://www.facebook.com/thecricketsdance
Release Date:
October 26, 2021
DVD/Blu-ray Release Date:

Synopsis: Southern attorney Angie Lawrence searches of the rightful owner of a journal recovered from an antebellum home she inherited. The journal is full of mystery and history that just may lead her to the future she has always dreamed of.

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The Crickets' Dance

 

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